Nurturing Naturally ~ A Breastfeeding Resource Fair

Free & Fun event for breastfeeding families, home visitors, nurses, dietitians, nutritionists, occupational therapists, speech therapists, la leche league leaders, breastfeeding USA counselors, developmental specialists, case managers, midwives, doulas, students, childbirth educators, peer counselors, lactation professionals and more!

*Save the Date
Nurturing Naturally – A Breastfeeding Resource Fair
Saturday, May 2nd, 2020
10 am – 2 pm
Spring Preserve
333 South Valley View Blvd. Las Vegas, NV 89107

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*2020 Nurturing Naturally Sponsorship Agreement

Please submit the completed agreement and logo by March 1, 2020, in order to guarantee placement in all printed materials as outlined on the benefits page. Sponsorships will be accepted after this date but all benefits may not be available due to printing deadlines. The payment is due prior to the event by April 15, 2020, however, signed agreement is due ASAP in order to secure limited space.

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*2020 Nurturing Naturally Volunteer Sign Up

Please provide your confidential information and availability for our Nurturing Naturally Event on Saturday, May 2, 2020. This event is held at the Springs Preserve and is a fun interactive event for breastfeeding families! We will need 25 Volunteers from the hours of 8 am-3 pm. Split shifts are available. Please provide availability and contact information below and contact us at admin@snvbreastfeeding.org for further information.

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*2020 Call for proposals.

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*2020 Nurturing Naturally Art Contest Entry Form

Entry into our Art Contest should be representative of the natural beauty and connection that a mother and baby share through breastfeeding. There will also be opportunities for artists to sell their art to local breastfeeding advocates/supporters. If you have any questions or concerns, please contact Rosemarie at (702) 592-7673. All information entered will be kept private, for use only by The Southern Nevada Breastfeeding Coalition for the Art contest purposes only.

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World Breastfeeding Week – August 1st – 7th 2020.

WBW Pledges and Events!

World Breastfeeding Week is fast approaching! Remember, this celebration is driven by YOU!

Talk to us about what exciting WBW events will be happening in your community by filling out this quick online form. By doing this, you’ll be part of an ongoing virtual mosaic display of WBW participants around the world and inform new celebrants of local events!

Registar Here

The Global Big Latch On –

BIG LATCH ON 2019

18,576 children breastfeeding during the one minute count.

19,414 breastfeeding people attended.

58,003 people attended registered Global Big Latch On locations to support breastfeeding.

Biglatchon.org



Black Breastfeeding Week – August 25th – 31st 2020

Top Five Reasons We Need A Black Breastfeeding Week

Why We Need Black Breastfeeding WeekBlack Breastfeeding Week was created because for over 40 years there has been a gaping racial disparity in breastfeeding rates. The most recent CDC data show that 75% of white women have ever breastfed versus 58.9% of black women. The fact that racial disparity in the initiation and an even bigger one for duration has lingered for so long is reason enough to take 7 days to focus on the issue, but here are a few more:

*1. The high black infant mortality rate: Black babies are dying at twice the rate (in some place, nearly triple) the rate of white babies. This is a fact. The high infant mortality rate among black infants is mostly to their being disproportionately born too small, too sick or too soon. These babies need the immunities and nutritional benefits of breast milk the most. According to the CDC, increased breastfeeding among black women could decrease infant mortality rates by as much as 50%. So when I say breastfeeding is a life or death matter, this is what I mean. And it is not up for debate or commenting. This is the only reason I have ever needed to do this work, but I will continue with the list anyway.

*2. High rates of diet-related disease: When you look at all the health conditions that breast milk—as the most complete “first food,” has been proven to reduce the risks of—African American children have them the most. From upper respiratory infections and Type II diabetes to asthma, Sudden Infant Death Syndrome and childhood obesity—these issues are rampant in our communities. And breast milk is the best preventative medicine nature provides.

*3. Lack of diversity in the lactation field: Not only are there blatant racial disparities in breastfeeding rates, but there is also a blatant disparity in breastfeeding leadership as well. It is not debatable that breastfeeding advocacy is white female-led. This is a problem. For one, it, unfortunately, perpetuates the common misconception that black women don’t breastfeed. It also means that many of the lactation professionals, though well-intentioned, are not culturally competent, sensitive or relevant enough to properly deal with African American moms. This is a week to discuss the lack of diversity among lactation consultants and to change our narrative. A time to highlight, celebrate and showcase the breastfeeding champions in our community who are often invisible. And to make sure that breastfeeding leadership also reflects the same parity we seek among women who breastfeed.

*3. Lack of diversity in the lactation field: Not only are there blatant racial disparities in breastfeeding rates, but there is also a blatant disparity in breastfeeding leadership as well. It is not debatable that breastfeeding advocacy is white female-led. This is a problem. For one, it, unfortunately, perpetuates the common misconception that black women don’t breastfeed. It also means that many of the lactation professionals, though well-intentioned, are not culturally competent, sensitive or relevant enough to properly deal with African American moms. This is a week to discuss the lack of diversity among lactation consultants and to change our narrative. A time to highlight, celebrate and showcase the breastfeeding champions in our community who are often invisible. And to make sure that breastfeeding leadership also reflects the same parity we seek among women who breastfeed.

*5. Desert-Like Conditions in Our Communities: Many African American communities are “first food deserts”—it’s a term I coined to describe the desert-like conditions in many urban areas I visited where women cannot access support for the best first food-breast milk. It is not fair to ask women, any woman, to breastfeed when she lives in a community that is devoid of support. It is a set up for failure. Please watch this video and educate yourself on the conditions in many vulnerable communities about what you can do (beyond leaving comments on blogs) to help transform these areas from “first food deserts” into First Food Friendly neighborhoods.

Posted August 19, 2014, in 2014 by Kimberly Seals Allers

Blackbreastfeedingweek.org

2020 Breastfeeding Symposium *information coming soon